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10 Foods to Survive on a Deserted Island

Let’s assume you shipwreck on a deserted island (knock wood). Somehow, half-buried in the sand you find a magic box with a message in it. The message asks you to specify 10 foods that the box will magically bring to you every day. These will be the same foods every day, so your choices have to be very specific. If you choose foods like pizza, which hold no nutritional value, you will die within a few months.

I was inspired to write this blog post because of the story about Napoleon. He was imprisoned for a while in the 1800s, and was asked what food he would like in prison. His captors would serve him the same food daily, hoping that he would expire “naturally” out of malnutrition.

But here’s how to trick the magic box (or your captors) to give you the highest bang for your buck, not only keeping you alive until rescue arrives, but to make you thrive!

1. 150 gr of pastured beef or goat heart
The heart must be cooked in bone broth with onion, garlic, sea salt, and grass-fed butter. We pick a heart over muscle meat because it’s more nutritious and it has the highest levels of CoQ10. We don’t pick liver because its extremely high levels of copper and A will work against your health if consumed daily (although liver must be consumed once a week on different living conditions, of course).

2. 150 gr of wild Alaskan salmon, sashimi raw
Very high levels of omega-3 and many other nutrients. Wild sardines or wild trout would be my No2 choices.

3. 100 gr of wild, raw oysters
If liver is the most nutrient-dense food of all, oysters is the No2. We pick it because of its high levels of zinc among others.

4. 1 pastured duck egg, raw or fried
Chicken eggs hold nothing to duck eggs. Duck eggs are more nutrient dense per gram, and they create fewer allergies than chicken eggs. Cooked in coconut oil if fried.

5.30 gr of sunflower seeds, soaked for 4 hours
These have very high levels of B1 and E (higher than that of almonds). Extra B1 is needed on a diet that doesn’t contain legumes or enriched flours.

6. 100 gr kale, raw
The most nutrient-dense vegetable. Served with extra virgin olive oil and sea salt.

7. 250 gr of white potatoes, baked
We need some starches, no matter what keto people say. We carry friendly bacteria in our gut that can only live on starch. White potatoes also carry the important resistant type of starch.

8. 100 gr of asparagus, or 100 gr of an avocado
Asparagus seared in coconut oil. Avocados would be my personal second choice, but you might want to pick that instead, if you are after more fiber and even more nutrition.

9. 500 gr home-made raw, full-fat goat kefir
Fermented foods are needed, and some calcium too. Kefir is the definite powerhouse in this case.

10. 1 pink grapefruit per day
Antioxidants and enough vitamin C. If grapefruits are unavailable (due to season), 150 gr of blueberries will do.

And of course, lots of natural, spring water.

As you can see below (click to view larger), that set of foods daily give you pretty much over 100% of your daily needs for most needed nutrients. You can’t go wrong with these!

Don’t be afraid about the trans-fats shown there and the low omega-3 shown in the chart. The database that contained similar foods did not include their pastured/wild versions, and so the data in that respect are a bit skewed. The vitamins/minerals are pretty much correct though.

Regarding honor killings

“Pregnant Pakistani woman stoned to death after marrying for love. ‘Honour killing’ in broad daylight outside Lahore high court involved father and brothers,” says The Guardian.

Terrible news, of course. But the also disturbing thing is that the commentators at the Guardian continue to get it wrong. They place “religion” and “non-education” as the reasons why these honor killings happen. I’m sorry, but these people, these supposedly progressive and smart readers of The Guardian, think only skin-deep.

YES, religion is often the vehicle where this terrible action materializes. But it’s not the reason why it happens. As someone who was beaten rather regularly by my traditional Greek father for having my engagement break apart in the early ’90s, I can tell you, there was no religion behind it. And education has often little to do with all this too.

It was primarily social pressure.

You see, when you live in tribal-like communities (like most non-Westerners do), where everybody kind of knows everybody else in the vicinity at large, there’s extreme social pressure to maintain status and control within both the group, and within the family. My father constantly used to tell me that “we live with others”, hence, in his mind, he was supposed to maintain an IMAGE. The image of a strong family man. A man who had everything under control. A man where you could TRUST to give him a job (my father was a house builder, a profession that requires trust).

As such, having a daughter breaking up her engagement to a man from the same village, it was a social disaster for him (in his own mind at least). The gossip that ensued was unbearable for my family. So he acted out any way he knew how to maintain his illusion of control.

I have forgiven my dad, I hold no grudges whatsoever. In fact, there is nothing to forgive, because I know where he’s coming from. Exactly because I can understand his limited point of view, and even if I don’t agree with it, it’s enough for me to not hold grudges.

Besides, the people who carry out these acts are victims themselves. Victims of their own inability to escape cultural programming, and victims of the closed society they’re in. Close societies like that do have their advantages (they never let one of their own go hungry, for example), but you gotta play with their unwritten, irrational rules to gain their support. Societies are exactly as twisted as humans can be, because they’re made out of humans.

So, Primary reasons of honor killings/beatings:

- Re-assuring of one’s social status by doing what others expects you to do according to the local societal rules.
- Power and control within the immediate and extended family (ego and super-ego at play).
- Illusion that this way they save the rest of the family (by taking out the bad apples, the family is again pure enough for the society’s expectations).

Secondary reasons that act as permission, rather than as the main reasons:
- Cultural traditions masquerading as religious laws
- Low educational status
- Dowry and other such financial assets getting lost

So there you have it.

Review: “The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine”

Avery sent me a free copy of Dr Terry Wahls new book, “The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine” to check it out.

The book starts with Dr Wahls health story, and how she got Multiple Sclerosis (MS). She was a vegetarian, and an athlete, and yet, she became very ill in early 2000s. She tried various solutions, including taking huge amounts of vitamins, adding and removing foods, when she finally managed to almost reverse her illness after following a wholesome Paleo-like diet.

I’ve been doing various forms of Paleo for 2.5 years now, and I’m glad to see Dr Wahls recognizing the different needs that different patients have. In the book, she suggests three different diets, one more restrictive than the other, depending on the severity of the symptoms. The first one simply removes gluten, dairy, eggs, and processed foods, the second one additionally removes most grains and legumes (Paleo-like), and the third one is a strict Paleo-ketogenic diet (minus eggs). She went through all three diets herself while trying out things, and she’s currently in the Paleo-ketogenic regiment.

Throughout the book there are testimonials of other people with MS, who have tried the Paleo/Wahls-diet and have semi-reversed their condition (aka made their lives livable). The book is very easily read, everything is laid out in plain English for everybody to understand.

My favorite parts of the book (that in my opinion needed more expansion) were the hints that Dr Wahls was giving about non-native EMF radiation, infections, mold, and other environmental problems that can have as much impact in our health than eating bad food has. I also loved her suggestions on eating sea vegetables, and offal.

The only part that I really disliked in the book was her insistence on removing eggs from the diet. She is deathly allergic to eggs, but she’s trying to impose this restriction to others too. In a response to me she claimed that “egg allergies are actually dramatically under-diagnosed”, but I have my reservations on this. I also hold reservations on her dairy suggestions. In my experience, I found that often, dairy is a secondary intolerance, created by gluten intolerance. When gluten is taken out of the picture, and the gut is healed, after a few months fermented goat/sheep dairy could often be eaten again without ill effects. But even if dairy must be taken out, given the severity of MS, I think her no-eggs suggestion is still overblown. Sure, some people will be intolerant to eggs, but I don’t expect the majority to be so.

Another addition that should be made in this book is information about FODMAPs. In my dealings with the Paleo community in the last few years, I have witnessed a 5%-10% of dieters who didn’t get better on plain Paleo, but had to go Paleo+Fodmaps to finally have their gut healed.

Other than that, I think that this is one of the most important new Paleo books out there, and people with major health problems (not just MS), should have a good read of this book and follow its instructions. It’s a book that explains in very simple terms the whys and the hows, and in my own experience with my own health problems, it has worked.

Healthy Food on the Budget for $100 per month

There are many financially-struggling people among us, and this is an article for them. This is my ideal of a healthy diet on the budget. I have included below a 2-day program, which pretty much fills-up the daily nutritional needs of the average adult, for a bit over $3 per day. The suggestions below are devoid of processed junk food, they’re gluten-free (which you will need, since gluten prohibits nutrient absorption, and most people react badly to it unbeknownst to them), it’s sugar-free, and it’s industrial seed oil-free (which create inflammation). It’s a moderate fat, moderate protein, and moderate carb diet (up to 200 gr net carbs). It’s not exactly Paleo, and not exactly vegetarian, but somewhere in between of both.

Day 1:
Breakfast, $1:
- Boiled egg
- Smoothie: full-fat milk kefir with 1/3 cup frozen fruits
Lunch, $1:
- 1 big potato, fried as french fries
- 25 gr liver (stir-fried) or 100 gr pork
- 1/6th of a big onion (stir-fried)
- 2 kale leaves (stir-fried)
- Green salad leaves, raw
Snack, $0.20:
- 25 gr raw sunflower seeds (raw, then soaked for 4 hrs)
Dinner, $1:
- Lentils or other beans (soaked for 24 hours, then cooked)
- Fried small fish
- 1/2 tomato

Day 2:
Breakfast, $1:
- Fried egg with a small potato hash
- Smoothie: full-fat milk kefir with 1/3 cup frozen fruits
Lunch, $1:
- Brown rice (preferably sprouted)
- 50 gr mussels or half of a can of oysters
- Veggies (raw or steamed)
Snack, $0.20:
- 25 gr raw sunflower seeds (raw, then soaked for 4 hrs)
Dinner, $1:
- Soup with veggies and boned chicken, or 50 gr pork heart

The important parts of the above recommendation:
- Very small amounts of liver are enough, since it’s the more nutrient-dense food known in existence, and it’s very cheap ($2/lb). Just 25 gr has a lot of B12, A, copper, riboflavin. You should not be having too much liver if you’re having it too often (because of potential A and copper toxicity), hence the just 25 gr suggestion. No more than 2-3 times a week, at that size.
- Use butter or olive oil, no seed oils or margarine.
- Canned oysters (drain them if they don’t come with olive oil) are needed to balance the liver’s copper, with zinc. They’re the second most nutrient-dense food known. The Dollar Tree sells them for $1.
- Buy meat and fish at your local Asian super-market. That’s where you’re going to find dirt cheap small fish, or mussels, or also cheap pork. Freeze what you don’t use.
- Sunflower seeds are the snack with the highest nutrition compared to other nuts and seeds (especially for vitamin E, where you’d need it, since no other cheap food provides it at that amount). Soak them for 4 hours before eating them, to deactivate their anti-nutrients.
- Ferment your kefir for 24 hours, before you blend it with frozen fruits. You’ll need the probiotics they offer, and not the aggravating lactose.
- Soak your legumes for 24 hours before cooking. This will deactivate their anti-nutrients. Same goes for brown rice, where you can also sprout it. There are various tutorials about it online.
- Potatoes are super-cheap, but you’ll also need your veggies: some fresh, some frozen in bulk. Get fruits in bulk, frozen. Unfortunately, most fresh fruit is expensive.
- If you buy a whole cabbage for cheap, ferment most of it (as sauerkraut or kimchi). This way, it will keep longer, and it will give you probiotics that you need.
- Buy your cheap chicken with bone, in bulk, frozen. You need it with bone because you must be eating at least 1 food slow-cooked, with bone (for collagen reasons, to keep your gut healthy).
- If your county’s water is bad in quality (e.g. too much chlorine and added fluoride), you might need more money, to buy bottled spring water. Filtering tap water won’t cut it for fluoride.
- Use Cronometer.com to track how well you eat, nutritionally. Also enable the “net carbs” option in its preferences.

Regarding sprouting

I’ve avoided legumes and grains for far too long. My body almost shut down in the 2.5 years of low-carb Paleo and even ketosis. Towards the end, I spent days and nights salivating about… rice. For someone so long on a high-fat diet, where I was fat-adapted, I should be getting my energy from fat, but instead, my body was instructing me that it needed starch. So I’ve added to my Paleo diet: legumes (lentils, beans — except peanuts), and rice. I felt better almost instantly.

However, this is not an article to shoot down the Paleo beliefs that legumes/grains are bad for you. I believe that when are cooked as-is, they are indeed harmful. They contain high amount of phytates and lectins. But then again, this is also true for nuts & seeds (if not more so!), and yet, the Paleo people are gulping them down like it’s candy.

After a lot of searching, I came to the realization that all these foods require soaking and/or sprouting. You see, the biological categorization of “seeds”, “nuts”, “grains”, “legumes” are all human categories. In reality, these are the same type of food: the babies of plants!

As such, the plant is protecting its babies by incorporating various poisonous ingredients in them, so humans and animals don’t eat them. And this is where soaking and sprouting is coming to complete the picture. These techniques are “fooling” the seeds to germinate. So when you soak or sprout from raw, these poisons are diluted away, or they get transformed to digestive enzymes (so they create no problems in the gut), or transform to even more vitamins (to aid the seed to supposedly germinate — or so it thinks!).

So now, I soak or sprout all my seeds, nuts, legumes and even brown rice. There are various techniques that can be found online. Especially for nuts, it was a revelation. Much better taste when soaked! I will never go back to eating dried “seeds”.

Why Planet Colonization might be a Pipe Dream

Dr Alessio Fassano, a world renowned researcher on celiac disease, said recently that even travelling from one continent to another changes your gut microbiome, and for some people this exacerbates autoimmune disease.

This made me think that if that’s true, then there’s no way in hell that we will ever be able to colonize other Earth-like planets. Not even if we terraform them. Humans require very specific bacteria & yeasts to stay alive, we are actually a shell made out of these colonies. We are not “I”, we are “them”, science has found in the last 3-4 years. Some doctors now wonder if we’re “humans with trillions of bacteria within us, or bacteria having a human experience”. Ponder on this for a second.

So just because a planet might have good levels of oxygen and gravity won’t mean sh*t. We won’t be able to leave our space suits and sealed colonies to just breathe that air. IF we do, and IF we survive that (I don’t believe we can), then in a few generations these people won’t be humans anymore. They’ll be something else.

In that light, I believe there are only two ways to visit “other places” out there. One, is a hybridization program. You make a hybrid between a native species, and humans. It’s possibly the way we’re going to go. Second way is to never leave your planet, learn to live sustainably here, and then visit other worlds with mind alone (e.g. meditation). Now, that second method is a more “out there” than most people feel comfortable with, but it’s the least intrusive method.

I, too, wish that the sci-fi wishiful thinking of simply finding a “habitable” planet was possible, but I just don’t see it happening. And that’s not because there aren’t any Earth-like planets, or that we don’t have the right inter-stellar travelling technology for it. I feel these are easier problems to solve than going around the problem of gut microbiome and actually surviving on a planet that we weren’t evolved with.

How to stop wasting food world-wide

A new paper says that billions of tons of food are wasted every year, both because of producers and transporters not taking a good care of them, but also because the average person is simply letting food rot in their fridge (in the Western countries, that is).

30% of all purchased meat & fish goes to waste, and 19% of veggies. Here’s my own analysis of the problem in my personal experience, and how to stop it.

Veggies & Fruits

I cook what I eat, the vast majority of the time. And yet, even myself I occasionally waste food. The reason being is this: I was sold too much of it. When I need 3 leaves of kale for my stew, I need just that: 3 leaves of kale. Not a bunch of 15 leaves! When I need 1 carrot for my soup, I need just that: 1 carrot. And when I need 5 tangerines, I need 5, not 30 in a big bag.

Instead, 90% of what’s sold in the produce aisles (and even in farmer’s markets!) are in big bunches/packages. If we were still living in the wild, I’d only pick what I needed for the day, not the whole field. This philosophy must come to all supermarkets too, by law, otherwise, we over-farm (and this has many consequences), we over-produce, we over-consume, and at the end we’re making heaps of garbage. Sure, what I’m suggesting here is not very capitalistic, but it’s logical, and it’s how we evolved to consume.

So here’s my idea on how to bring the “buy only what you need” philosophy to the market:

- Create three color-coded areas in the produce aisle: Yellow, Red, Blue (so all color blind people can see them too). Plastic bags for produce will have such colors too.
- Fruits and veggies that cost (let’s say) $1 per pound, are in the Yellow area. Produce in the Red area cost $3/lb, and Blue cost $5/lb. More expensive super-markets or organic produce can be sold more expensively, but still at this 3-tier pricing scheme (the actual prices are something to be decided by the parties involved, not the focus of this article).
- The trick is that none of these veggies are sold in bunches. Big veggies (e.g. cabbage, iceberg), are sold as whole, 1/2 and 1/4 sizes. People can mix and match what they buy, as long as these are part of the same color-coded area/price.

This type of selling goods have the following benefits:
- People are not going to waste so much food anymore, because they will be buying exactly what they need. Since everything is sold by weight, they will be careful of how much they buy. There’s now incentive for it.
- People will also have incentive to try more veggies! People who never tried collard greens before, they will buy just 1 leaf (since they won’t be paying much for it for that weight), just to try it once. The next time, they will try something else they never had before. Eventually, that’s how you make people acquiring healthier habits.
- Food consumed will be fresher, since people will be buying, let’s say, 1 potato and some salad greens for dinner, instead of trying to finish big packages they bought a week earlier.
- Larger package produce can still be sold (e.g. for restaurants), but only as frozen.
- Fewer plastic bags and packaging will be needed.

On the downside, less produce will be sold overall (about 25% less), which might be something that super-markets and producers won’t like. But we should be seeing the bigger picture of all this, rather than the profit of few. Producers might find an incentive to move to organic-only food, so they can sell at slightly higher prices, for example. Or, since they will be producing less of their main crop, they can use the rest of their land to produce something else. This is good for rotating crops too. Overall, I think producers will find a way to make a profit, it’s the super-markets that will mostly lose with this idea. But it’s something that has to be done.

Meat & Fish

For meat & fish, my idea is to not sell meat packages with more than 80gr to 150 gr (depending on fat and bone content of the cut). For a low-fat cut for example, 80gr is enough for one serving size for one person. Instead, what we see today, are huge meat packages sold, sometimes with huge steaks in them. 30% of all food going to waste is meat!

Humans don’t require that much of it. An egg in the morning with fermented dairy, an 80gr fish/shellfish for lunch, and an 80gr of white or red meat for dinner are more than enough to get your protein needs going. Instead, people are over-consuming meat nowadays, and it’s driving our animals to farm prisons (in order for these industries to meet demand), and our wild fish in extinction (farmed fish are worse than farmed animals food-wise).

In my country, Greece (and other traditional countries to my knowledge), people would eat red meat once or twice a month. They had wild game or chicken once a week. Eggs 3-4 times a week. Seafood twice a week. Dairy daily. But red meat, well, not that often. On top of that, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday were strict vegan days for Greeks, since the Orthodox Church required it.

Sure, the whole turkey, whole chicken and the occasional roast can still be sold as such, since they’re easily freezable after they’ve been cooked, and so they rarely go to waste. But when it comes to individual pieces of beef, lamb & pork, or huge packages of poultry pieces, these do go to waste. Providing small packages of a single serving is how you fix this problem. A family of 3 can buy three ~80gr packages of such meat, while a single person will only buy one.

The benefits of such a system are this:
- No need to over-fish our oceans. No need to over-farm fish (which are kept in terrible conditions and are toxic to eat too often).
- No need to over-produce meat. Since we would be buying less meat, we can fit these animals easier in our plains, to live a more respected and natural life. No need to fill them up with so many hormones and antibiotics. Less farming, less toxic waste in our environment.
- Since small packages will be sold, the people would be more curious to try more types of fish and meat, e.g. ostrich, bison, goat, duck, goose etc.

Again, the people who will lose the most are the super-markets and the meat industry. Well, bad luck. It’s time to see the big picture and where we go as a species on this rock, than just to be looking straight at our pockets and profit.

The true key

Finally, it’s more than possible that this type of market will drive food prices up for the consumer too. This is why people need to leave mega-cities, move back to smaller towns, and have their own vegetable garden and hens. It’s easy to say “I’m going to live in NY or SF or LA because that’s where it’s so cool to be right now”, while in order for you to be living there and having a cool life and a smashing career, you DEPEND on a relentless food industry that commits CRIMES against the Earth and all its living creatures, on your BEHALF. It’s easy to close our eyes and think that food arrives in the supermarket from the clouds, but it isn’t so.

For the record, I’m not a vegan or vegetarian. I’m in fact, Paleo. But I’m also not blind. Which is why I keep my own herb garden while all my neighbors waste precious California water to water fucking useless grasses and ornamental bullshit. I can’t wait to leave this place one day, and move back to Greece, cultivating my father’s land up in the high mountains of Epirus. Probably have a few chickens too. That’s life. That’s responsibility. That’s true freedom.

Supplementation for Vegans

Disclaimer: I’m not a dietician or a doctor, so don’t take the following as medical advice.

IF I was to become a Paleo-vegan (I won’t), a version of veganism that follows the most healthy practices of Paleo to be added in, it would look like the following. But even that healthful diet won’t be enough on getting all needed nutrition. Have a read about any possible needed supplementation below.

1. A vegan version of the Paleo diet

- No glutenous grains, at any point (no wheat, barley, rye, and most common oats). Always read labels to make sure you’re not eating gluten.

- Avoid vegetable seed oils and margarine (they’re either trans-fats, or too high in omega-6). Don’t fear the good fats, and use liberally: coconut oil (for medium heat cooking), extra-virgin olive oil (for salads), avocado oil (high-heat cooking), coconut cream.

- No excess sugars/carbs. Keep it between 100 and 200 gr net carbs, depending on your physical activity. Avoid artificial sweeteners and soda.

- Avoid GMO corn. Organic, whole corn is fine.

- Avoid GMO soy. Whole, organic soy is fine, tamari gluten-free soy sauce is ok too. Non-GMO unpasteurized miso is ok too, as long as it doesn’t contain gluten/barley in it. Natto is ok. Eat logical amounts of soy, don’t overdo it. Soy can mess up with your estrogen if eaten a lot, as a replacement for animal products, rather than as a legume.

- No processed foods. This means: no things like tofu, cereals, cakes, sweets, egg/meat-like substitutes, which are extremely processed and industrialized. Eat limited amounts of gluten-free pasta/pizza/bread or soy milk, since these are still considered quite processed or have additives.

- Legumes, rice, quinoa (which aren’t allowed on normal Paleo) are a go in this veg*n diet. From these high-carb foods, lentils are the best in terms of their nutrition/carb ratio. Make sure you soak legumes for 24 hours before cooking. Sprouted lentils are best, avoid peanuts.

- Also eat plenty of fresh veggies, tubers, fruits. Some nuts and seeds are ok, but don’t overdo it with these, as they’re extremely high in anti-nutrients and Omega-6. For nuts, it’s best to soak them first, to render their anti-nutrients inert.

- Cook with garlic, ginger and turmeric very often. These are the 3 most potent “herbs”.

- To get enough B1 on this diet, you’ll need nutritional yeast (sprinkle it on kale chips).

- Eat different types of sea vegetables 3-4 times a week. You’ll need the iodine.

- Drink plenty of no-fluoride-added water (spring water). Herbal teas are ok, caffeine is out.

- Walk barefoot on soil almost daily, out in the sun, showing some skin too (for UV and D3).

- Meditation, yoga, exercise (weights and short sprints — not endurance or aerobic/cardio).

2. Supplementation for vegans and vegetarians

Of course, we should be getting most of our nutrition via alive food (some of it raw, too). Supplements can only go so far, compared to real food. But on veg*n diets, some compounds and vitamins either don’t exist at all, or they’re found in very limited quantities. Vegans might need all of the supplements proposed below, and vegetarians most of them. Even full Paleo eaters might need a few of the supplements proposed, since our modern food options are lacking.

– Compounds that the human body needs and are found only in meat or fish:

- Taurine
- Carnosine
- L-acetyl-carnitine
- Creatine
- The bio-available version of B12 (sublingual)
- The retinol version of vitamin A
- A vegan DHA supplement. Chia/flax only offer the ALA version of Omega-3, not the DHA version, which is the one bio-available to humans. This is the only supplement that you might need to take a bit more often than the rest.

– Compounds found in limited quantities in plant food:

- Coq10 Ubiquinol (not ubiquinone). Mostly found in offal normally. It’s the life of our mitochondria, and one of the most important nutrients. In the western world, where people don’t eat offal, pretty much everyone is deficient of it (veg*n or not).
- Calcium. Might be an idea to drink almond milk, or minimally-processed coconut milk with added Calcium, if you don’t want to supplement with it or eat dairy.
- Magnesium Malate (20 mins before sleep). Almost everyone needs more magnesium, even folks on full Paleo, due to our soil/water being depleted of it after the Industrial Revolution.
- Zinc. Mostly found in oysters. Boosts the immune system.
- Lysine. Mostly found in pork meat. Helps fighting various viruses.
- D3 2000 IU. Taken in mornings. Use only if you’re not going out in the sun a lot, or if your blood test shows that you’re deficient of it (definitely check D3 out via a blood test).
- K2-Mk4. Take this, unless you eat natto (fermented soy beans) routinely.
- PQQ. Mostly found in animal hearts. Provides neuroprotection, cognition and cardioprotection.
- Iron. Take this only if your blood tests show that you need it, if your doctor approves it, and if you’re not in menopause. You gotta be careful about this one.
- Collagen types I, II, and III. Since you can’t drink bone broth on vegan-paleo, you might need collagen (especially if you’re low in CoQ10, which helps produce it). Also an interesting supplement if you’re over 35 years old, or have joint/knee pains.
- Choline, but only if you’re not eating eggs.
- B1, but only if you’re not using nutritional yeast on some of your snacks.
- E tocotrienols, but only if you’re not eating almonds, or other seeds and nuts daily.

IF you’re a female, trying to get pregnant, you might need folate for 6 months prior to getting pregnant (make sure it’s folate, not folic acid). Discuss this further with your doctor.

DO NOT take all these vitamins every day. I’d say, just spread them around in the week, taking no more than 3 per day. Do a list of what to take on each day of the week. Give your body a rest for some weeks in the year, and don’t take any such pills at all. Also, don’t take A and D3 together, as they’re antagonists. Use cronometer.com to track what you’re eating every day (enable the “net carbs” option in its preferences)!

3. Further actions

Finally, set money aside to have blood tests once a year. Check D3, iron, Mg, B12, DHEA/s, thyroid (including T3 and REVERSE T3, that most doctors don’t test), Calcium, A, E, HS-CRP (inflammation status), liver status, estrogen, cortisol, insulin, cholesterol/trigs status.

Top-10 Must-Eat Paleo Foods, Part II

Two years ago I wrote a blog post about the most must-eat Paleo foods with the highest health benefits. Now, it’s time for a second part on this post.

1. Baobab dry powder
A staple among the Hanza tribal people (that are often a reference among Paleo dieters), baobab is a fruit similar to coconut. It has blood glucose stabilizing effects among other benefits.

2. Water kefir
This is good for those who can’t do any dairy, and so they can’t follow my original milk kefir suggestion. Water kefir grains are consisted by about 30 different bacteria & yeasts, compared to 40+ in home-made milk kefir (commercial milk kefir doesn’t have more than 12). The only downside of water kefir is the amount of sugar required to ferment. After fermentation for 48 hours, the generated soda drink is 5% sugar, which might not be ideal for some. However, if you’re not doing any other type of fermented food, and you want to be drinking sodas, then it’s a good drink to have, with lots of probiotic effects.


Raw cacao, baobab powder, amla powder, chia seeds, and a sea vegetable mix. I use the four first ones on my goat kefir smoothies, with added fruits.

3. Smoothies & raw food
On Paleo, fruit juices are out because they don’t contain fiber. However, smoothies are more acceptable, even if some in the Paleo community still talk against them. The idea is that according to Paleo gurus, we’re supposed to eat 2/3 in weight in veggies. Only 1/3 in weight is supposed to be protein, despite what you see on the Instagram #Paleo photos (huge steaks, miniscule amounts of veggies). Dr Wahls (the doctor with multiple sclerosis who overcame her disease with Paleo) suggests 3 cups of sulfur veggies, 3 cups of green leaves, and 3 cups of colorful veggies or fruits a day (as non-starchy as possible). That’s a lot of veggies to take down, so to reach such volumes you might need to eat big salads, do smoothies, or make soups.

4. Chia whole seeds & Flax ground seeds
The human body apparently can’t transform ALA type of Omega-3 to the useful EPA/DHA fatty acids. However, they do help out a bit in the whole process. I use chia on my kefir smoothies, and ground flax as breading for fish. I prefer flax to almond flour, because almond flour is much higher in anti-nutrients and Omega-6 than flax. These are also particularly useful if you have your own chickens. Chickens can convert ALA to DHA very efficiently, so eating their eggs and meat will be extremely beneficial, since they’ll have more a lot more O-3 than conventional chickens (most chickens/eggs, even the organic/free-range ones, are extremely high in O-6).


My milk kefir, water kefir, and two soda bottles for my water kefir.

5. Garlic, Ginger and Turmeric
These are the most potent “herbs” you can use in your cooking. Plenty of health benefits and anti-oxidant value. Prefer your garlic as young and as raw as possible btw. Cook with these very frequently!

6. Non-fluoridated water
This might come as a surprise to you, but on Paleo and especially on Paleo-ketogenic you must drink a lot of water. More than usual. But for water to work its magic, it must be spring water — not tap water. It must have minerals in it, no chlorine, but most importantly, it should not have fluoride (apart from a small amount that occurs naturally, rather than being added). Fluoride can’t be removed with normal water filters. Fluoride prohibits healing and must be avoided at all costs. Switch to a fluoride-free toothpaste too. It’s indeed not very nice that you would have to buy plastic water bottles for your drinking/cooking water, since they contribute to pollution, but the alternative is as grim too. Check on your county’s website to see if your water supply has added fluoride in it. In California, they all do, for example.

The solution of Lite-Paleo

Not everyone has to go full Paleo or very low carb to get health benefits. Some people might not need such extreme solutions as much if they’re relatively healthy, or if they can’t afford it as much, or if simply they don’t want it as much. If I had to suggest just a 5 bullet-point version for a Lite Paleo diet, that is less restrictive but it still has major health benefits, it’d be this:

1. No gluten, ever. This is the only no-no, persisting even in the Lite version of Paleo. So, don’t consume anything made out of wheat, rye, and barley. Unfortunately, most oat cultivars are also problematic. Read all labels, use gluten-free “tamari” soy sauce, and avoid beer, and fries fried on oil that flour’ed food was previously fried in it (as in most restaurants).

2. At home, never use vegetable seed oils or margarine. Cook or fry with coconut oil, grass-fed butter or animal fat, and use extra virgin olive oil for salads. Don’t be afraid of the right fats!

3. Limit sugar/carbs & processed foods. This means, avoid (even if gluten-free): cereals, pizza, bread, pasta, cakes, processed GMO soy (e.g. soy milk, tofu etc), high fructose corn syrup, candy etc. Particularly avoid these during the first few months of your diet (healing time), but it’s not necessary to cut them down completely afterwards. Sometimes, indulge on the gluten-free versions of these foods if you must, but in moderation, and rarely. However, completely avoid industrially-prepared trans-fats.

4. Give priority to wild, oily fish (e.g. Alaskan salmon), shellfish (especially oysters), and seaweed (multiple varieties) over meat. Have some type of seafood almost everyday, even if in small quantity.

5. ADD the following to your diet: kefir (home-made is way more potent), bone marrow broth (cook with it often), offal (especially liver & heart), and unpasteurized sauerkraut/kimchi. Soak your beans/lentils for 24 hours before cooking. Eat a lot of veggies (2/3s of weight compared to protein in each meal must be veggies), some raw. Also, fruits, tubers, nuts & seeds, dairy, pastured eggs, seafood & meat, raw & local honey, are all ok to consume freely! Rice, non-GMO whole corn, and quinoa are ok too, but not as often.

That’s it, really. Basically, it’s just about removing or limiting 3 types of high-inflammation foods from your diet, and adding back foods we evolved with. Here are some recipe ideas!

Bonus! Try to drink plenty of water, but with no added fluoride in it (check with your county to see if they add any). If they do add fluoride, move to natural spring water. If they don’t add any, tap water is ok, but filter it anyway to remove its chlorine. Also, move to a fluoride-free toothpaste. Avoid all sodas and drink very little alcohol.

Bonus 2! Go out in the sun (with some exposed skin) for at least 15 minutes a day. Also beneficial: walk barefoot among vegetation! Maybe even meditate!