iTunes and DRM-free music

A few months ago, iTunes went DRM-free, as you know. This is the most brilliant move they made. Here’s why:

My iTunes purchases during the DRM era (3 years): $2
My iTunes purchases since DRM-free (2 months): $203

Enough fucking said. Numbers talk by themselves.

7 Comments »

James wrote on March 31st, 2009 at 5:41 PM PST:

why? Because your not using an iPod/iPhone, because you like the better quality, you want to play the music on non-apple hardware? or? is there an actual reason why you’ve spent up on DRM-free music?


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Eugenia wrote on March 31st, 2009 at 5:56 PM PST:

Because I like the freedom, and the better quality. Because I want to be streaming my music to other devices (usually our PS3+HDTV), because I want to share my purchased music with my husband who has a different iTunes installation.

And I simply don’t want to have to deal with the consequences of DRM in 5 years down the line when I have authenticated the DRM songs so many times to my various iPods/iTunes installations and I can’t do so anymore. I want the freedom to playback my music to the so many gadgets that I own (and I own a lot a lot of them).


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Eugenia wrote on March 31st, 2009 at 6:07 PM PST:

BTW, I did buy one $10 album during the DRM era from iTunes, but that album happened to be DRM-free at the time. 😉


Stephen B. wrote on April 1st, 2009 at 12:29 PM PST:

>why?

DRM’d music has one thing going for it: convenience/immediacy (since you get the music immediately upon purchase). That’s it.

In every other way, even just ordering the physical CD from some place like Amazon makes more sense – and then convert it to MP3/Ogg/AC3/whatever. It’s cheaper (by album, at least), there’s a greater selection of music available on CD, you get higher-quality audio, and you don’t have to put up with the absurd, arbitrary limitations imposed by DRM schemes.


kevin wrote on April 1st, 2009 at 12:52 PM PST:

please explain why you used itunes and not amazon for that $203.

amazon uses no big 10mb program and is a better interface for comments.


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Eugenia wrote on April 1st, 2009 at 12:53 PM PST:

Stephen, we usually buy CDs too in our home, we have over 400 CDs. But thing is, music is moving away from physical mediums, and DRM-free music is good enough for most people. The only people who hate how mp3s sound are musicians who can hear the difference.

Additionally, in some countries it’s illegal to rip CDs.


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Eugenia wrote on April 1st, 2009 at 12:58 PM PST:

>please explain why you used itunes and not amazon for that $203.

For three reasons:
1. I prefer to not have an Amazon account in general, for reasons I won’t get into here.
2. It’s more convenient to use the Apple Store since I am using an iPod and an iPhone. I have downloaded a lot of (legal) indie music online that don’t even have tags, let alone album art, and I had to fix that myself. Amazon’s music might come with the album art separately, but when you add the album art yourself on itunes, the album art is not always viewable on the iPod Touch because of a bug (iPod Nano doesn’t have the bug for example). But the bottom line is: the manual addition to itunes and subsequent tag/art thingy is not bulletproof if you don’t buy the music from iTunes Store where all the tags/art comes in properly. And that makes my Touch’s music UI look like crap.
3. I prefer the iTunes Store UI. Much more streamlined.


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