Categorized accessory guide for HV20/30

Casual shooting
* A steady tripod, specifically with a fluid head ($80)
* A few rubber bands (info, $0.01)
* A spacious camera bag ($10)
* Enough tapes ($20)
* An ND4 (0.6) filter ($20, outdoors only)
* A petal hood ($15, fotodiox.com, outdoors only)
* A gray card (for indoors shooting, $5)
* Optional: A bigger, extra, battery ($40)

Special Interest (macro)
All of the above, plus:
* Tiffen 2x, 3x, 4x close-up kit lenses ($30)

Documentaries
All of the above, plus:
* A Canon or Raynox telephoto lens (make sure it’s specific to HD, $200)
* A polarizer filter ($35)
* A UV filter ($20)
* An HD wide angle lens (e.g. Canon WD-H43, the Raynox 7000Pro, $200)
* A white balance gray card (usage, $5)
* A shotgun microphone with windscreen support (e.g. Canon DM-50, $150)
* A lavalier microphone (e.g. the Audio-Technica ATR-35S, $40)
* Extension cord for the lavalier mic ($15)
* Tiffen Universal Dolly (to be used only on thick carpet, $50)
* A shoulder bracket (e.g. B&H sells one for $45)
* A reflector (e.g. the Westcott 5-in-1 Reflector Kit, $100)
* A focus wheel (DIY, or from Irvb, $40)
* A lens cleanser, blower, and brush ($20)
* A rectangle hood ($20, fotodiox.com)
* A lens hood ($20)
* [Optional] The Tiffen HDTV-FX3 filter (low-contrast movie look, $200)

Music videos
All of the above, plus:
* A steadycam (e.g. $170 Hauge MMC, or a DIY $15 one)
* 1000W Smith Victor KT1000 continuous lights (e.g. from Adorama, $130)
* A portable CD player for lip-syncing ($70)
* A clap, to synchronize the audio with the sped-up lipsyncing in post processing ($10)
* A 35mm adapter (e.g. TwoNeilHD, or JAG35Pro, with a 5m GG, achromat & condenser)
* Bogen / Manfrotto 293 Lens Support with Quick Release ($70)
* Actual 35mm lenses (price varies)
* Lens hoods for the various 35mm lenses (price varies)
* An external monitor: the Sony DVP-FX820 (NTSC) or DVP-FX870 (PAL) ($180)
* A female-to-female RCA adapter to connect the external monitor ($8)
* A DIY monitor holder (instructions, $7)
* A second, cheaper, tripod to hold the monitor and the monitor holder ($20)
* External monitor Hoodman H900, for when shooting in sunlight ($100)

[Alternatively, you can mount the monitor and monitor holder on the main tripod itself like this, above the camera (instead of on a separate tripod), but you will need the Shrig Rig ($125) for that, instead of the suggested ‘Manfrotto lens support’.]

Short films
All of the above, plus:
* Rode Stereo Videomic ($250)
* Rode Boompole ($120)
* Rode Dead Kitten windscreen ($30)
* A second person holding the boom mic (beg someone)
* Good 3.5mm headphones, to evaluate audio during shooting ($60)
* Tiffen Steady Stick, or this trick, to be used as a small crane ($100)
* A smooth dolly (e.g. a DIY one, or the Glidetrack, $170)
* Car charging kit for external camera, mic, monitor ($70)
* A power strip for battery charging on location ($10)
* A folding director’s chair for the shots not requiring camera movement ($10)

Full featured films
You don’t use an HV20/30 in that case, silly. 😉

In any case, you always need a good plan. Plan ahead your shots by sketching, and leaving notes on a notepad about camera movement and composition.

14 Comments »

Jim wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 5:56 PM PST:

I would think I would add that little memory card to the list that allows you to adjust exposure manually. Having said all this, I was going to post a question of setting up the HV20 for exposure indoors? Can you walk us thru this procedure using a gray scale card?


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 5:59 PM PST:

>little memory card to the list that allows you to adjust exposure manually

I do not believe in that method, sorry. If you need light, buy continuous lights.

>procedure using a gray scale card?

Link explaining how to use it was added on the article above about it. I have already blogged about it months ago, and you read it already (you even commented to that blog post). So I am not sure why you ask about it again.


anon wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 8:02 PM PST:

nothing personal but this is s superfluous post for anyone like me who reads your blog and has basic knowledge.


Jim wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 8:27 PM PST:

Eugenia:
I am on state disability and I have short term memory loss.
I am not joking and so forgetting things is common.
So, it is understandable that you have posted and I am a bit confused. Be patient with me, I appreciate your help


Jim wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 8:30 PM PST:

The link to using the gray card is not functioning for me, but
I am sure I am not the only one that reads your blog regularly and lack basic knowledge, I think one of the reasons to read this blog is to gain that basic knowledge so we can be like
anon. I at least attach my name to my posts and I value Eugenias comments highly and in fact we always discuss this blog at the monthly Seattle Sony Vegas Users Network Meeting


Jim wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 8:32 PM PST:

One last comment Eugenia, is that even with continious lights, the choice is to use the automatic controls or to use what manual controls are available and so I am still confused as to a good way to use the available manual controls since normally my indoor video is too grainy


Jim wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 8:48 PM PST:

Ok really really last comment.
I think I found the referenced link on google it is about using a gray card to set “white balance” on the hv20. After setting white balance do you then making any adjustments for apeture or exposure?


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on October 8th, 2008 at 11:19 PM PST:

>this is s superfluous post for anyone like me who reads your blog and has basic knowledge.

Not everyone who reads my blog has a basic knowledge. Some do, some don’t. So I guess this post is not for you, in which case, pass through, or make your own research about the items mentioned in the blog post. Google is your friend.

>to use the available manual controls since normally my indoor video is too grainy

The camera’s sensor can only do so much in dark. Just manual controls won’t fix the problem. Lights would though. Consider buying some continuous lights for indoors. They make a real difference.

>do you then making any adjustments for aperture or exposure?

If necessary yes. It’s not always the case, but you can to turn on the Zebras to see if you are overexposing or not.


Jim wrote on October 11th, 2008 at 9:58 AM PST:

Does Irv have contact info so we can buy the focus ring”


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on October 11th, 2008 at 12:31 PM PST:

You contact him via this thread.


Chandra wrote on October 13th, 2008 at 9:05 PM PST:

Hey Eugenia,

Whats the difference between 35mm adapter and 35mm lens? Don’t they perform similar functions?


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on October 14th, 2008 at 2:31 AM PST:

On a consumer camcorder, you need an adapter to use these lenses.


Chandra wrote on October 14th, 2008 at 10:12 AM PST:

oh.. so does that mean when we buy the 35mm adapter that are on sale for $200.. on hv20 forums.. you still have to get that 35mm lens? i am confused.


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on October 14th, 2008 at 12:54 PM PST:

Yes, you still need all the different lenses to attach to it.


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