Google’s Chrome

Today I tried Google’s new web browser, Chrome. I liked what I saw. It is fast to load, fast to render, and it’s streamlined. They pretty much pulled a new Firefox (comparing what Firefox did to Mozilla with its speed and streamlined interface). Even the Flash plugin seems to run a bit faster, as full screen 480p at Hulu.com has fewer frame drop outs than on Firefox/IE on my dated 3Ghz P4.

However, unless Google creates the equivalent of NoScript, I am not going to move away from Firefox — at least in regards to my Windows machine. Malware is so common these days, and spyware so disturbing, that I simply do not browse anymore without NoScript on Windows. This little Firefox extension disables any Javascript code from web sites that you don’t have manually authorized. While it is time consuming in the first week you use NoScript to instruct it to allow/disallow all these hundreds of web sites you usually visit, eventually it pays back with its added security.

Chrome uses Google’s anti-phishing/malware information regarding “bad” sites” in order to protect the user, but who’s going to protect you from the sites that are not marked as dangerous yet, or from sites that use spyware via third party ads and their code changes all too often for Google to track properly?

However, I must say that I don’t expect Google to create something like NoScript because the whole noise around Chrome is about their javascript engine. Adding the option that actually disables scripts by default until a user authorizes it goes against that model — in expense of my security.

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