PS3 and a new TV, Part II

We went to Frys yesterday and we saw that new Sony TV with 120 Hz support. Bad for video games, but good for movie lovers. Which makes it a great TV for me, and a bad one for JBQ. I also loved the picture/color adjustments that it comes with. Dunno what we will end up buying in 2-3 years time or when our current one dies.

JBQ spent all day on the PS3 — for a change over working 24 hours a day. He downloaded lots of game demos (and Comcast will probably cut us off for too much bandwidth consumption) and the PS3’s drive is already 1/3 full. What the hell do they put in these demos and they make them so big?

JBQ also bought 3-4 of these $7 games for the PS3, like Loccoroco and Flow. Trippy…

8 Comments »

mikesum32 wrote on September 23rd, 2007 at 8:59 PM PST:

Why would that be bad for gaming ? Isn’t 120 Hz just about perfect for 24 fps movies and about 30 fps for NTSC video ?


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Eugenia wrote on September 23rd, 2007 at 9:35 PM PST:

It is great for movies, but not for video games because every video game frame will have to be either quadrupled or doubled (for 60 fps games) and this creates non-smooth movement.

The solution for these new TVs is that they should be made able to adjust their Hz rather than being fixed at 120 Hz.


Billy wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 1:58 AM PST:

>It is great for movies, but not for video games because every video game frame will have to be either quadrupled or doubled (for 60 fps games)

Why’s that? They can’t do it exactly?


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Eugenia wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 2:36 AM PST:

There are two ways to do 120 Hz TVs, either black out frames or do interpolation. If the TV employs the first technique, it will look weird on fast motion.


Billy wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 11:32 AM PST:

>There are two ways to do 120 Hz TVs, either black out frames or do interpolation. If the TV employs the first technique, it will look weird on fast motion.

Is blacking out frames common? (Sorry, I’m completely new to 120 Hz TVs.) It seems weird that the TVs would be bad at fast motion, because that’s (reasonably) exactly what they’re advertising them as doing well. (Why get a high-refresh-rate TV if it handles motion poorly? That seems exactly counter-intuitive.)


JBQ wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 1:33 PM PST:

The issue is related to the fact that when a signal is double-framed from 60 to 120 Hz, the same frame will get displayed twice, so that moving objects will appear in the same location for 2 frames, then in a different location for 2 frames, resulting in jerky motion. The issue is only really relevant for “flickering” TV technologies (i.e. CRTs and plasmas).

On top of that, the logic to go from a 60 Hz signal to 120 Hz introduces a slight delay that tends to make games a little bit harder.


Billy wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 1:48 PM PST:

>so that moving objects will appear in the same location for 2 frames, then in a different location for 2 frame

Sure, but if each frame is displayed for half the duration it should be (in a 60 FPS game)…

>The issue is only really relevant for “flickering” TV technologies (i.e. CRTs and plasmas).

This makes sense.

>On top of that, the logic to go from a 60 Hz signal to 120 Hz introduces a slight delay that tends to make games a little bit harder.

This I could also understand.

Thanks for the info! By the way, if you’re into that sort of game, Warhawk is absolutely worth the money.


JBQ wrote on September 24th, 2007 at 1:53 PM PST:

I’m definitely not into online multiplayer games, and I’m not a great fan of shooters, so warhawk isn’t really appealing to me. It’s all a matter of preference, and I’m not saying that it’s a bad game in any way, just that this isn’t the kind of game that I’m attracted to.


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