Stop piracy: get your music for free

Being the lazy fat porcupine that I am, I was just reading Digg tonight and I found a link to this web service. It’s an interesting service actually: it lets you upload all your music and then letting you accessing it from any place in the world via the internet. Kinda like having an iPod with you at all times, except not having an ipod, plus it doesn’t work without an internet connection. And it’s legally questionable because it allows users to listen to other’s music. Anyways.

The FIRST song that auto-plays when you go to that web site is this: “Weekend Full of Weekends” by the “Vanderveen”. What an amazingly catchy song! The kind of song that it could be used in an iPod commercial in fact… And it’s a free download!

So, one link led me to another, and I ended up at GarageBand.com. I knew of that site for years now, but I never bothered to have a look at it. Apparently some amazing songs are hosted there, waiting for a free, legal, download! The advantage of GarageBand.com is that because it allows ratings and contests, songs can be “charted”. This is a very convenient feature in the chaotic indie scene, an easy way to find out what’s actually good. And I already found which CD to buy from CDBaby next too: the one from the local SF band “Cold Hot Crash“. I first heard them tonight at GarageBand, and they were so good that they deserve a buy. The “Bright Side” song from the “Rantings Of Eva” band is great too.

I downloaded 900 MBs of high quality music tonight. All legally. All for free.

Update: I downloaded another 2 GBs of legal music today from mp3.com, SubPop, InSound and FingerTips music sites. Hopefully Comcast won’t cut off my connection because of the bandwidth consumption. I now have overall about 12 GB of legal indie music (mostly alternative rock). It feels like a huge library and I will have to clean it up and keep only the good pieces. I really don’t know how people can fill up 60 and 80 GBs iPods… I don’t seem that I will ever need more than 20 GBs for music, and maybe another 10 GBs for my own videos (which is why I hope for a 32GB iPod Touch or iPhone v2.0)…

9 Comments »

Phil wrote on September 14th, 2007 at 11:59 PM PST:

I’ve never been a big music buyer. And as far as pop music goes I can find most of the recordings of my youth on YouTube (or if I’m going to be naughty SoulSeek). My preference for “free” (web radio) music nowadays is Magnatune Classical renaissance and baroque on iTunes – I’m getting to the stage in life where pop music just sounds like “thud, thud, thud …” which must make me an old fogey I suppose. 🙂


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Eugenia wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 12:20 AM PST:

Well, depends what you mean by “pop”. I mostly listen to Alternative Rock and Electronica these days, although I do listen all kinds of music (including classical, heavy metal, dance and ambient). The ones I avoid are rap (few exceptions only), jazz and middle-easter-like music (including Greek bouzouki/pop music). From the pop world, I do like Madonna. Can’t stomach Britney.


mikesum32 wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 12:32 AM PST:

I like the new site called grooveshark

You can listen and buy user uploaded and hosted file. FLAC, MP3, and OGG are supported now. I think there is caching mechanism, but not sure if it’s used for streaming and buying, or just meta data.

I saw it on boingboing. It has a few flaws, but is usable. Sign-up is free. I have 3 invites, but I bet you could sign up as well without them. They let me in after all 😉 It uses Java to do the caching and streaming.

I have about 1200 songs up so far.


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Eugenia wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 12:41 AM PST:

Don’t want to be a party pooper, but it doesn’t seem to be a legal service. I mean, I don’t think it’s legal to “share” your music, even if it’s listen-only. If that was legal, there wouldn’t be take down notices on youtube — which has far worse audio quality no less.


mikesum32 wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 12:57 AM PST:

They have contracts and agreements, of course it’s legal. Every company isn’t YellowTab.


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Eugenia wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 1:02 AM PST:

Well, this doesn’t make much sense… How do you get contracts and agreements with every artist out there? Yes, you can make an agreement with the 4 major labels, because you know where to find them, and possibly the top-10 indie labels too. But then how do you find the every random artist that someone has uploaded music from?

Sorry, but this business sounds a bit shady. It seems that they might not eventually get sued by the big guys, but the small ones…


Luis wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 7:45 AM PST:

Well, this doesn’t make much sense… How do you get contracts and agreements with every artist out there?

I guess it works like a radio. They just pay to a performance rights society for the right to broadcast (stream, in this case) the music. It’s perfectly legal.

Another question is if users are going to pay for listening to these streamed songs…


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Eugenia wrote on September 15th, 2007 at 12:12 PM PST:

Yes, users will pay for new songs they find there and they want to listen to.


peejay wrote on September 17th, 2007 at 4:32 AM PST:

> And it’s legally questionable because it allows users to listen to other’s music.

I searched all over for an answer to this and couldn’t find one (maybe there isn’t one, yet). I don’t want to spend the time to upload a bunch of music if it’s all going to be shut down next week.

Another similar one is mediamaster.com which let’s you queue uploads, but I like the interface of anywhere.fm much better.


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