RE: In the cult of the damned

Stormrider blogged recently about a friend of his who got into the trap of cults and the supernatural. This is a good opportunity for me to write a bit more about my own similar experiences in my younger age. I have already blogged about my experience with a Christian sect, but I don’t think I’ve blogged about my time in Corfu, when I was studying to become a nurse in the early ’90s.

I hated the nursing studies. Computers was always what I wanted to do, but my parents had a different idea about my future. So, for the 8 months I was forced to be in Corfu (1991-2), I was miserable. I hated the job, the two female teacher-witches we had there, the whole sub-culture in the hospital between the doctors and the established nurses etc. Because I didn’t fit in, and because I am by nature a very curious person, I started reading books. Anything outworldish was welcome. Soon enough, I was the “weirdo” of the class — where my classmates would only be interested in clothes and clubbing, I would prefer to explore what’s beyond. It cost me dearly of course, as the one person I really cared for back then, would not take me seriously after finding out my little interest in parapsychology. Looking back at that era, I find everything and everyone around me at the time to be a complete joke. That includes myself, of course. I was an idiot among [complete] idiots.

I never got into any cults/sects, but I did learn as much as I could about both sides of the subject, and I do give credit to myself for that. I maybe never learned how to properly apply mascara, but geez, I did learn what frauds Uri Geller or astrology or crystals are. I bet my ex-classmate girlfriends still read the astrology column on their husband’s daily newspaper, or even worse, they might occasionally be visiting “readers”. Shortly after my time in Corfu I completely renounced the supernatural and today I am an agnostic and I prefer scientific answers rather than charlatanisms. However, I think it’s important that most young people do go through the process of exploration by themselves — even at the danger of falling at the pitt– by taking the journey and find the right answers and proofs on their own. It’s an age that’s filled by curiosity anyway.

6 Comments »

Thom Holwerda wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 2:33 AM PST:

However, I think it’s important that most young people do go through the process of exploration by themselves — even at the danger of falling at the pitt– by taking the journey and find the right answers and proofs on their own.

I’d much rather have my kids experimenting with alcohol and drugs (what you oppose) than exploring cults (what you apparently approve). To me, cults are much more dangerous.

Any sane logic behind this seemingly arbitrary distinction? Maybe because you indeed KNOW cults, and don’t know, at all, alcohol and drugs? Because you’ve never even tried them?

Not trying to be judgmental, just asking an honest question.


blg wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 4:13 AM PST:

Scientology is truly scary…it’s sad because the Wikipedia article on the Lisa McPhearson tragedy is a scrubbed clean when researching the case yields so many crazy acts. Apparently they haven’t given up their proclivity for tailing people with private invesitgators either, eg., Bill Sweeney in his BBC Panorama documentary about Scientology (that airs tonight, coincidentally) BBC article


This is the admin speaking...
Eugenia wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 6:55 AM PST:

>than exploring cults

Thom, don’t piss me off again. You misunderstood what I am saying. I NEVER said to become part of a cult just so you explore them. What I said instead is STUDY the phenomenon (for me, that’s a form of exploration). I was never part of any cult in reality. But I did do my share of exploring my options and learning about everything I could when I was young. Just by teaching to a teenager that “this or that does not exist” does not necessarily turns off their curiosity meter. This is why many, must find the truth by themselves.

Scientology and many other cults are extremely dangerous to simply mess out with. But reading about Scientology is important. Problem is, that most people don’t even do that! And THAT is why they so easily fall in the pit. Because they never took the time to explore the frauds around them.

Just on Friday night I was reading about that stupid woman with the two sick sons who sent lots of money to Peter Popoff who promised her a miracle holly water! I mean, if that woman knew the world around her, and what is capable of, she would never have fallen for that, no matter how desperate she was.


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Eugenia wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 9:03 AM PST:

stormrider wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 11:24 AM PST:

I strongly aggree with your statement about young people and the process of exploring, though (as you said) it’s a very dangerous path.

The fact is that lots of experienced cult members have developed very sophisticated techniques in finding thigs that concern you etc and expoiting them.


mikesum32 wrote on May 13th, 2007 at 8:54 AM PST:

Whoa man, major negative vibes. I have some crystals that will totally clear out your chakras and make you happy and mellow.

😉


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